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Ann Med. 2011 Jun;43(4):312-9. doi: 10.3109/07853890.2010.549145. Epub 2011 Feb 1.

Metabolic syndrome in childhood and increased arterial stiffness in adulthood: the Cardiovascular Risk In Young Finns Study.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Finland. teemu.koivistoinen@uta.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We conducted the present study to examine the associations of two different paediatric metabolic syndrome (MetS) definitions and recovery from childhood MetS with arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV), an index of arterial stiffness, measured in adulthood. METHODS. A total of 945 subjects participated in the base-line study in 1986 (then aged 9-18 years) and the adult follow-up in 2007 (then aged 30-39 years). Cardiovascular risk factor data were available at both base-line and follow-up. In the follow-up study, arterial PWV was measured using a whole-body impedance cardiography device. RESULTS. Subjects suffering from MetS in childhood (prevalence 11.1%-14.1%) had higher arterial PWV after 21-year follow-up when compared with those not afflicted by the syndrome in childhood (P < 0.007). An increasing number of the MetS components in childhood were associated with increased PWV in adulthood (P for trend = 0.005). Subjects who recovered from the MetS during the 21-year follow-up period had lower PWV than those with persistent MetS (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION. MetS in childhood predicted increased arterial stiffness in adulthood, and recovery from childhood MetS was associated with decreased arterial PWV in adulthood. The current results emphasize the importance of the prevention and controlling of MetS risk factors both in childhood and adulthood.

PMID:
21284533
DOI:
10.3109/07853890.2010.549145
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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