Format

Send to

Choose Destination
  • This is a preview / test site. Please update your PubMed URL to pubmed.gov.
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Adv Nutr. 2017 Sep 15;8(5):728-738. doi: 10.3945/an.117.015545. Print 2017 Sep.

Abdominal Obesity and Risk of Hip Fracture: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies.

Author information

  • 1Students' Scientific Center.
  • 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics.
  • 3Students' Research Committee, and.
  • 4Department of Operating Room Technology, School of Paramedicine, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.
  • 5Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, and.
  • 6Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, a-esmaillzadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir.
  • 7Obesity and Eating Habits Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • 8Food Security Research Center, Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; and.

Abstract

Data on the association between general obesity and hip fracture were summarized in a 2013 meta-analysis; however, to our knowledge, no study has examined the association between abdominal obesity and the risk of hip fracture. The present systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies was undertaken to summarize the association between abdominal obesity and the risk of hip fracture. We searched online databases for relevant publications up to February 2017, using relevant keywords. In total, 14 studies were included in the systematic review and 9 studies, with a total sample size of 295,674 individuals (129,964 men and 165,703 women), were included in the meta-analysis. Participants were apparently healthy and aged ≥40 y. We found that abdominal obesity (defined by various waist-hip ratios) was positively associated with the risk of hip fracture (combined RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.46, P = 0.01). Combining 8 effect sizes from 6 studies, we noted a marginally significant positive association between abdominal obesity (defined by various waist circumferences) and the risk of hip fracture (combined RR: 1.36; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.89, P = 0.07). This association became significant in a fixed-effects model (combined effect size: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.25, 1.58, P < 0.001). Based on 5 effect sizes, we found that a 0.1-U increase in the waist-hip ratio was associated with a 16% increase in the risk of hip fracture (combined RR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.29, P = 0.007), whereas a 10-cm increase in waist circumference was not significantly associated with a higher risk of hip fracture (combined RR: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.36, P = 0.19). This association became significant, however, when we applied a fixed-effects model (combined effect size: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.27, P < 0.001). We found that abdominal obesity was associated with a higher risk of hip fracture in 295,674 individuals. Further studies are needed to test whether there are associations between abdominal obesity and fractures at other bone sites.

KEYWORDS:

abdominal obesity; hip fracture; meta-analysis; waist circumference; waist-hip ratio

PMID:
28916573
PMCID:
PMC5593104
[Available on 2018-09-01]
DOI:
10.3945/an.117.015545
[PubMed - in process]

Publication Types

Publication Types

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center